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Winterize Your Omaha Home to Keep Pests Out: Signs You May Need to Winterize Your Home

Winterize Your Omaha home to keep pests out With winter just around the corner, you will want to keep a close eye out for any pests who may try to find a warm place to nest inside of your home. Fortunately, if pests do decide to infiltrate your home, they will likely give off signs to clue you into their presence. Here are just a few signs you can look out for indicating that there may be pests in your Omaha home. You Hear Strange Sounds You may be able to detect the presence of larger pests in your home by the sounds they make. For instance, if you have mice or rats in your home, you may hear the sound of scurrying feet in your house in the middle of the night. In the quiet of the night, you may even hear pests inside of your walls. The sounds pests make when your house is quiet can often be the first indicator of their presence in your home. You Find Dead Bugs/Insect Body Parts Just like spotting live pests in your home, you do not want to discount the significance of discovering dead insects in your house. While discovering…
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How To Recognize and Control Asian Lady Beetles In Omaha

Asian Lady Beetles In Omaha, NE             Now that temperatures are dropping and fall is in the air, you may notice swarms of multicolored Asian lady beetles in Omaha flocking to the exteriors of  houses and buildings. This is especially the case for structures with a light-colored exterior. Don’t be surprised to find these pests invading your attic, wall voids, ceilings or other quiet areas where they take up housekeeping during fall and winter. Here’s what you need to know about Asian lady beetles and how they can be prevented and controlled. Damage Done By Asian Lady Beetles Asian lady beetles (Harmonia axyridis), which are a species of the ladybug, were first brought to North American in the early 20th century to control aphids and scale insects. Although these bugs are beneficial for gardens, they can be problematic when they get into homes and buildings. They're considered as pests because when they’re crushed, they leave ugly yellowish stains on walls as well as a foul odor. They can bite although their bites don’t cause severe injuries or spread disease. However, the dust from their corpses can trigger asthma symptoms and allergic reactions in humans. Physical Characteristics and Habits They have about…
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The Intricacies of Omaha Spider Webs and What it Tells Us About the Spiders Who Build Them

Omaha Spiders Spider webs are delicate silken creations designed for one purpose -- catching prey. Since most spiders are unable to see, they rely on their sense of touch to produce webs and catch prey. Spiders construct webs where they sense they will catch food. Often they choose to build their traps on the sunny side of the house because insect activity is abundant where the sun shines. Web-spinning spiders spend their entire life attached or near their web. In fact, newborn spiders begin spinning webs as soon as they are born. Spiders are highly adaptable and if they find they are not catching enough prey in one location, they will pack up and find a more suitable place. It is interesting to note that orb spiders have 7 different glands in their abdomen and each gland produces a different type of silk. Sometimes a spider needs to make a cocoon, swathing band or sticky globules to hold its prey in place. Orb spiders come equipped with a type of safety mechanism. Have you ever disturbed a spider only to see it drop like a rock on a thread of silk? When the spider senses the danger has passed, up…
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Keeping Centipedes Where They Belong (Out of Your Omaha House!)

Centipedes In Omaha What's the creepiest creepy-crawly you can think of? For many people, it's the centipede. (Or maybe the spider. But the centipede is a close second.) Though centipedes are beneficial and generally harmless, they're not really welcome in your home. In fact, the presence of centipedes is indicative of another pest issue you need to take care of. Centipedes Even though centipede means "100 legs," centipedes can have as few as 15 pairs of legs. They do most of their hunting at night; during the day, they take refuge in cracks, cardboard boxes, and crawl spaces. There are three types of centipedes in North America: • Bark Centipedes: These live mostly outside, but they can find their way into a basement or cellar. They will bite a human if they feel threatened, and while the bite is not deadly to a person, it does hurt. • Cytopid Centipedes: This is another outdoor-preferring centipede with a painful bite. • House Centipedes: As their name indicates, these are the centipedes you're most likely to find in your house. They prefer moist environments: check for them in your basement or bathroom. They're fast little buggers, and if you disturb them, they're…
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4 Reasons Why Omaha Mice Must Be Removed Professionally

Omaha Mice Information Mice infestation is a common problem and should be taken care of immediately. You might think that there’s nothing to worry about if you see just one mouse scurry across your kitchen floor, but remember that mice breed quickly. A female mouse can reproduce over 50 babies over the course of a short time. Here are a few reasons why you need to get those mice out, and why getting professional help is the best way to go. Mice Pose Health Risks Mice carry with them all sorts of diseases, bacteria and viruses. Hantavirus is commonly found in mice, as is LCM (Lymphocytic choriomeningitis), which is found in around five percent of mice and can cause serious damage if left untreated. Salmonellosis and Tularemia are just two more diseases that are spread by rodents. The real danger that mice pose is through their droppings. Urine patches, fecal droppings and saliva puddles can contaminate those that come into contact with them. These droppings can be left in sensitive areas, such as in your kitchen and in your food pantry. Mice can contaminate your eating utensils and even any food left out without you knowing about it. Although rodent…
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Everything You Need to Know About Oriental Roaches In Omaha

oriental roaches Origin Oriental roaches have been crawling around the planet since the beginning of time. It is difficult to pinpoint exactly where they came from but current thought is that they began their revolting life in Africa or the southern parts of Russia. Appearance From shiny black to a dark reddish-brown, oriental roaches differ in size according to gender. Males are slightly smaller, growing to 25 mm with wings that cover ¾ of its body leaving the remaining few abdominal segments exposed. Females are larger, growing to a length of 32 mm. Instead of wings, females possess wing pads that protect the first couple segments of its body. Neither gender is capable of flight. Habits and Diet Outdoor living is preferable due to the easy availability of water and a variety of food sources. Although roaches are not considered to be a social insect, such as the ant or bee, large groups can be found living together in many different locations. Think warm, moist, and dark areas such as under mulch in landscaped areas, under piles of leaves, stones, or debris. They breach interior access wherever gaps, cracks, and crevices are found. Once inside your home, they could be found…
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Why Do Wasps Attack? The Things You Should Know

Wasps In Omaha Why do wasps attack humans? Aside from when a person steps on a wasp nest, the majority of wasp attacks will occur in the late summer. This is at the same time the normal social order of a colony is deteriorating. It is a result of a circular change in behavior, when the wasp colony will stop focusing on raising worker wasps to nurture queens. These new wasp queens will then hibernate for the winter and begin new colonies in the spring. Regardless, a wasp will only sting a human if they perceive them as a threat. Typically, while intimidating looking, they tend to be rather gentle as long as they not stimulated by a clumsy or deliberate intrusion. Unlike bees, for the most part, you shouldn't see them flying about your face. Generally, in the spring and summer, they are attracted to protein. So, you can expect them buzzing around dog food or garbage. Later in the year, the develop a sweet tooth and will become attracted to soda cans and fruit juice. Moreover, they do have a memory and will return to a location even after a food source is removed. Have you ever been attacked after killing…
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How to Control a Boxelder Bugs in Omaha

Boxelder bugs in Omaha Boxelder bugs are considered a nuisance pest that feeds on boxelder, maple, and ash trees. They possess no venom and as such are generally harmless to people. They do not sting or transmit diseases but will sometimes bite out of self-defense. Location – Boxelder bugs are found on boxelder, maple, and ash trees. Appearance – The boxelder bug is an 11-14 mm elongate-oval shaped bug with 6-legs and two antennae. Habits – During the warmer months of spring and summer, boxelder bugs like to hang out on the sunny-side of your home or business. They thrive on the leaves and seeds of female boxelder trees. Interior migration takes place when outdoor weather signals winter is on the way. They gain entrance to a structure by way of cracks, crevices, and gaps caused by the natural constant fluctuation of the changes in the weather. Hibernation begins in the late fall or early winter. They begin to leave the comfort of their winter home as Spring approaches. Boxelder bugs do not cause damage to the interior but can leave unappealing orange-colored droppings on furniture and linen. Reproduction – Boxelders begin their reproduction process in the spring and continue…
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6 Things to know about Termites and Real Estate Termite Inspections in Omaha

Real Estate Termite Inspections Omaha Now that it is summer time and we look forward to the good weather ahead of us, it's difficult to think about soft-bodied bugs destroying our homes. It's important to understand termites, though, so you can protect yourself from their destruction. So, we put together six things you should know about termites and about real estate termite inspections in Omaha. Let's start with a few basics about termites. Where do termites live? Living in your house is not their first choice. They live in the soil with hundreds, sometimes thousands, of their family and friends. Termites are nature's recycling team, turning dead trees, leaves and other dead plant matter into compost that enriches the soil. The home invasion problem occurs when they are searching through soil for something to decompose and find nothing until they bump into our houses. The wood framework of our homes  and wood fencing make perfect munching material for them. It's important to remember that termites are not a problem to humans -- until they try to recycle our homes. How do they get to my house? Well, scientists learned that termites live in the soil and move around in methodical…
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Omaha Honey Bees: Good for Agriculture, Bad for your House

There's no doubt that honey bees are extremely valuable due to their important role as pollinators. More than 100 crops, including onions, broccoli, blueberries, and strawberries, rely on honey bees. In fact, honey bees contribute more than 15 million to U.S. agriculture production. Despite providing millions of dollars in honey and beeswax products, in addition to their agricultural contributions, honey bees are a hazard. Honey Bees in the News Honey bees and their declining numbers have been a real concern for many in the agricultural industry. The decline is referred to as Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD. CCD is when an entire colony of bees simply disappears. There are several contributing factors to CCD, including disease, however pesticides are viewed as a significant reason for CCD. With honey bee colonies facing a 30% annual failure rate in North America, a renewed interest in beekeeping is growing among those concerned about the honey bee's future. Honey Bees in the House While your neighbor may be one of the many to establish beekeeping in their backyard, it is important that they don't make their way to your house. While unlikely, one can't be too careful, especially if there are family members who…
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