Blog - Page 3 of 6 - Miller Pest Omaha

4 Reasons Why Omaha Mice Must Be Removed Professionally

Omaha Mice Information Mice infestation is a common problem and should be taken care of immediately. You might think that there’s nothing to worry about if you see just one mouse scurry across your kitchen floor, but remember that mice breed quickly. A female mouse can reproduce over 50 babies over the course of a short time. Here are a few reasons why you need to get those mice out, and why getting professional help is the best way to go. Mice Pose Health Risks Mice carry with them all sorts of diseases, bacteria and viruses. Hantavirus is commonly found in mice, as is LCM (Lymphocytic choriomeningitis), which is found in around five percent of mice and can cause serious damage if left untreated. Salmonellosis and Tularemia are just two more diseases that are spread by rodents. The real danger that mice pose is through their droppings. Urine patches, fecal droppings and saliva puddles can contaminate those that come into contact with them. These droppings can be left in sensitive areas, such as in your kitchen and in your food pantry. Mice can contaminate your eating utensils and even any food left out without you knowing about it. Although rodent…
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Everything You Need to Know About Oriental Roaches In Omaha

Oriental roaches Origin Oriental roaches have been crawling around the planet since the beginning of time. It is difficult to pinpoint exactly where they came from but current thought is that they began their revolting life in Africa or the southern parts of Russia. Appearance From shiny black to a dark reddish-brown, oriental roaches differ in size according to gender. Males are slightly smaller, growing to 25 mm with wings that cover ¾ of its body leaving the remaining few abdominal segments exposed. Females are larger, growing to a length of 32 mm. Instead of wings, females possess wing pads that protect the first couple segments of its body. Neither gender is capable of flight. Habits and Diet Outdoor living is preferable due to the easy availability of water and a variety of food sources. Although roaches are not considered to be a social insect, such as the ant or bee, large groups can be found living together in many different locations. Think warm, moist, and dark areas such as under mulch in landscaped areas, under piles of leaves, stones, or debris. They breach interior access wherever gaps, cracks, and crevices are found. Once inside your home, they could be found…
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Why Do Wasps Attack? The Things You Should Know

Wasps In Omaha Why do wasps attack humans? Aside from when a person steps on a wasp nest, the majority of wasp attacks will occur in the late summer. This is at the same time the normal social order of a colony is deteriorating. It is a result of a circular change in behavior, when the wasp colony will stop focusing on raising worker wasps to nurture queens. These new wasp queens will then hibernate for the winter and begin new colonies in the spring. Regardless, a wasp will only sting a human if they perceive them as a threat. Typically, while intimidating looking, they tend to be rather gentle as long as they not stimulated by a clumsy or deliberate intrusion. Unlike bees, for the most part, you shouldn't see them flying about your face. Generally, in the spring and summer, they are attracted to protein. So, you can expect them buzzing around dog food or garbage. Later in the year, the develop a sweet tooth and will become attracted to soda cans and fruit juice. Moreover, they do have a memory and will return to a location even after a food source is removed. Have you ever been attacked after killing…
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How to Control Boxelder Bugs in Omaha

Boxelder bugs are considered a nuisance pest that feeds on boxelder, maple, and ash trees. They possess no venom and as such are generally harmless to people. They do not sting or transmit diseases but will sometimes bite out of self-defense. Where are Boxelders found? Boxelder bugs are found on boxelder, maple, and ash trees. What do Boxelder Bugs look like? The boxelder bug is an 11-14 mm elongate-oval shaped bug with 6-legs and two antennae. What is the Boxelder's habitat? During the warmer months of spring and summer, boxelder bugs like to hang out on the sunny-side of your home or business. They thrive on the leaves and seeds of female boxelder trees. Interior migration takes place when outdoor weather signals winter is on the way. They gain entrance to a structure by way of cracks, crevices, and gaps caused by the natural constant fluctuation of the changes in the weather. Hibernation begins in the late fall or early winter. They begin to leave the comfort of their winter home as Spring approaches. Boxelder bugs do not cause damage to the interior but can leave unappealing orange-colored droppings on furniture and linen. What is the reproduction cycle of Boxelders?…
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6 Things to Know About Termites and Real Estate Termite Inspections in Omaha

Real Estate Termite Inspections Omaha Now that it is summer time and we look forward to the good weather ahead of us, it's difficult to think about soft-bodied bugs destroying our homes. It's important to understand termites, though, so you can protect yourself from their destruction. So, we put together six things you should know about termites and about real estate termite inspections in Omaha. Let's start with a few basics about termites. Where do termites live? Living in your house is not their first choice. They live in the soil with hundreds, sometimes thousands, of their family and friends. Termites are nature's recycling team, turning dead trees, leaves and other dead plant matter into compost that enriches the soil. The home invasion problem occurs when they are searching through soil for something to decompose and find nothing until they bump into our houses. The wood framework of our homes  and wood fencing make perfect munching material for them. It's important to remember that termites are not a problem to humans -- until they try to recycle our homes. How do they get to my house? Well, scientists learned that termites live in the soil and move around in methodical…
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Omaha Honey Bees: Good for Agriculture, Bad for your House

There's no doubt that honey bees are extremely valuable due to their important role as pollinators. More than 100 crops, including onions, broccoli, blueberries, and strawberries, rely on honey bees. In fact, honey bees contribute more than 15 million to U.S. agriculture production. Despite providing millions of dollars in honey and beeswax products, in addition to their agricultural contributions, honey bees are a hazard. Honey Bees in the News Honey bees and their declining numbers have been a real concern for many in the agricultural industry. The decline is referred to as Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD. CCD is when an entire colony of bees simply disappears. There are several contributing factors to CCD, including disease, however pesticides are viewed as a significant reason for CCD. With honey bee colonies facing a 30% annual failure rate in North America, a renewed interest in beekeeping is growing among those concerned about the honey bee's future. Honey Bees in the House While your neighbor may be one of the many to establish beekeeping in their backyard, it is important that they don't make their way to your house. While unlikely, one can't be too careful, especially if there are family members who…
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Are Termites the Reason for Global Warming?

Don’t these wood chewing creatures cause enough damage? Are we to believe that termites are responsible for the increased levels of methane and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the two greenhouse gasses scientists say contribute to global warming? In a 1982 New York Times article, researchers said that termites emitted 30% of the Earth's atmospheric methane. It was estimated as long ago as 1982, that there were ¾ of a ton of termites for every human. That’s a lot of termites. With that many termites, it is astonishing that anything made of wood has not completely disappeared. The Hierarchy of Termites All termites are social, live in colonies, and have a social hierarchy. A small colony can chomp down 5 grams of wood every day of the year. Imagine the inner framing of your home disappearing at the rate of 2-feet per year! Given enough time, termites will chew and munch your home straight down to the foundation. The same as a tornado except the accumulated damage takes longer. But is it the fault of the termite that humans decided to build their homes out of wood? Workers Worker termites can’t digest wood without the help of certain microbes in their…
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How to Tell if You Have Gnats or Fruit Flies in Omaha (and What to do About it!)

Gnats or Fruit Flies? The arrival of warm weather brings blooming flowers, longer days, open windows, and swimming pools. Unfortunately, it can also bring household pests, as well. While your yard may fill with mosquitoes, honey bees, or even wasps, your space inside the home may also prove vulnerable to infestation. Tiny, annoying, flying insects swarm your fruit bowl and hover over your household plants. The culprit? Gnats. Or are they fruit flies? How can you tell whether you have gnats or fruit flies? Is there a difference? Do I have Gnats or Fruit Flies? Both gnats and fruit flies can present a challenge inside the home, and they seem to arrive in full force once the weather turns warm. But while they may look similar, gnats and fruit flies are two different insects, both within the fly family, but with different characteristics. If you notice tiny bugs swarming around your fruit bowl, your child's juice box, your trash can, or even in your kitchen sink drain, you're probably facing a fruit fly infestation. Fruit flies resemble regular house flies, but they're a fraction of the size. They may have red eyes and their bodies can appear black or brown, while their…
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About Bird Mites in Omaha

Bird mites in Omaha are tiny, biting parasites which live and feed on birds. They are tiny, tending to be less than a mm long, oval, have 8 legs, and are semi-transparent until they are digesting blood; then they darken up. There are many kinds of bird mite (also known as bird louse); some are specific to a particular species of bird, and others are not that picky. Lifestyle Bird mites live on or near birds. Some live in the nests of birds, others directly on the bird. They do not usually harm the birds on which they live unless is it a particularly heavy infestation or the bird is ill from another cause already; the bird is more likely to harm itself scratching at the bites. They are most active in spring and early summer. They prefer warm temperatures and like humidity. Living in a dry area doesn't mean you won't find them, though, as the birds themselves can be a source of humidity for the mites. Diet Bird mites do not only eat the blood of birds. While some do eat blood, others will eat the feathers or skin of their avian hosts. However, the feather and skin…
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Cicada Killer Wasps: What to Know and What to Do

With summer on the way, you can look forward to baseball, swimming at the lake, and backyard barbecues. The cool mornings and warm evenings make it inviting to linger outside with friends and family. Of course, outside is also where you'll start noticing some wasps, which probably isn't your favorite part of summer. The Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln identifies the cicada killer wasp as the biggest wasp in Nebraska. Omaha Cicada Killer Wasps These big fellas can be up to two inches long--not something you want landing on your shoulder. They'll start showing up in the middle of the summer when their favorite snack, the cicada, is readily available. They also eat grasshoppers and crickets. Fun facts: according to the Department of Entomology at Iowa State University, cicada killer wasps are solitary creatures, so they don't live in colonies or depend on other wasps to help with basic housekeeping and child-rearing. The females do the hunting, and they're the only ones who can sting. In general, cicada killer wasps are not aggressive, but they will sting if they feel threatened. Where to Find Them You usually look up to spot a wasp's nest, but when it comes to the cicada…
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